Hoja(おいしい)!|Editor’s Note #49

台湾の料理や食材の歴史を掘り下げると、この島を囲む海や山のように深い。台湾料理といえば、中国本土からの移民がもたらした食文化だけでなく、日本的な食べ物もあれば、台湾原住民の食文化も混ざっていたりもする。台湾の食がユニーク […]

12/03/2015

台湾の料理や食材の歴史を掘り下げると、この島を囲む海や山のように深い。台湾料理といえば、中国本土からの移民がもたらした食文化だけでなく、日本的な食べ物もあれば、台湾原住民の食文化も混ざっていたりもする。台湾の食がユニークなのはここにある。中国各地のバラエティに富んだ料理に、原住民の食、オランダやスペイン、日本の統治時代にもたらされた各国の食文化の影響を受けながら育まれてきたからだ。つまり世界各地のおいしい料理のメルティングスポットというわけなのだ。
日本や他の西洋諸国の人々とは異なり、台湾人の多くは台湾料理を食べている。というのは、今日は和食、明日はイタリアン、次の日はハンバーガー、そして次の日はタイ料理といったように、毎日、異なる料理を食べる習慣が見られない。もちろん外国料理のレストランもあるし、さまざま料理も楽しめるのだが、基本的に台湾人は台湾料理を食べている。そしてよく食べる。夜になれば街のあちこちにさまざまな屋台が立ち、魯肉飯や牛肉麺、刈包や小籠包…といったおいしそうな食べもののにおいが漂ってくる。まるで、毎晩がお祭りのようでもある。こうした夜市で食べる食は僕らの胃袋を満たし、栄養を与えるだけでなく、魂にも活力を与えるものである。そして各地の市場や屋台の存在は、その地域で暮らす人々や家族を結びつける役割も果している。だから台湾人はごく自然にコミュニティをつくり上げることができるのだ。
今号では、台北で活躍する男性クリエイターのキッチンを訪ねた。ローカルのキッチンを訪ねることで、僕らは本物の台湾の味がどうやって生まれるのかを知りたかったからだ。男性に焦点を当てたのも、きっと女性よりも男性の料理のほうがシンプルで、より基本的な台湾料理にふれられるだろうと思ったから。今号には彼らが調理してくれた料理のレシピも掲載している。どれもとても簡単で家庭でもつくられる料理ばかり。特集を読んだら、ぜひ台湾料理をつくって味わってみてほしい。Hoja!
 
Hoja! (delicious!)
The history of food and cooking in Taiwan is as deep as the ocean that surrounds the mountainous island. In Taiwanese cuisine influences from all of mainland China can be found; in addition Japanese styles are prevalent and native Taiwanese dishes live on as well. Taiwan’s unique variation of Chinese regional cooking styles mixed with aboriginal Taiwan as well as Taiwan’s past rulers: the Dutch, Spanish and later Japanese have created a literal melting pot of some of the world’s top cuisines.
In Taiwan, unlike Japan or Western Nations, Taiwanese people still largely eat Taiwanese food. It’s not like in many cities where eating Japanese on one night, Italian the next, a hamburger the next and then a bit of Thai food has become the norm. Of course there are foreign restaurants, for an occasional taste of abroad, but all in all Taiwanese people eat Taiwanese food. And people also eat out a lot. Every night in numerous neighborhoods throughout the country small food stalls are set up and as the sun sets the smells of Braised Pork Rice, Beef Noodles, Gua Bao Buns, and Dumplings fill the evening air and draw the city to the ultimate daily outdoor night festival. In these outdoor markets food becomes both a mechanism to fill and nourish one’s stomach and body as well as a place to invigorate one’s soul; as the markets connect individuals with family, and neighbors thereby naturally giving Taiwanese people a sense of community.
In this issue of Papersky we hit the kitchens of some highly creative Taiwanese gentleman. We wanted to show the ‘real’ Taiwan flavor by showing what natives are cooking up in their own kitchens. We focused on what the guys were cooking because in general they were making simpler dishes then their female compatriots and in this issue of Papersky we wanted to provide readers with genuine Taiwanese recipes that were simple and could be made at home.
Hoja !
» PAPERSKY #49 Taiwan | COOK Issue